National Fisherman

Monday, October 24, 2011 — It was a busy week for me, and finally a week with fish!

I left San Juan Island on Monday evening, traveled to Seattle (Fishermen's Terminal), then ran the Satisfaction 4 hours at 8 knots to Hood Canal. Linda, again, was my crew, and we found a mooring buoy around 3 a.m.

We started fishing at 7 a.m. and had close to a couple hundred fish for the day, most of which were caught in the morning. I left before the change-of-light set, which is always good when gillnetting salmon, to run for the fishing in Seattle's Area 10, which started at 5 p.m. Seattle fishing turned out to be rather slow, with only 50 or so fish for my efforts, which ended at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 26.

I was right back at it on Wednesday night, running to Hood Canal to make the Thursday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. opening. This time I fished the whole period, which was a good thing because I had a nice change-of-
light set of 80 fish for a quick hour (total time) in the water. I could have let that set go a bit longer before the closure, but I (and my gear) would probably have drifted into the Hood Canal Floating Bridge on the ebb current, which is NEVER a good thing.

Again, I headed over to the Seattle side, a three-hour run, and wrapped up the fishing over there for another 45 fish.

Still scratchy in Seattle, but decent fish showing in the canal, it had been an exhausting week of no sleep, but with reward of fish.


Inside the Industry

The anti-mining group Salmon Beyond Borders expressed disappointment and dismay last week at Alaska Governor Bill Walker’s announcement that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with B.C. Premier Christy Clark.

This came just days after his administration asked members of his newly-formed Transboundary Rivers Citizens Advisory Work Group to provide comment on a Draft Statement of Cooperation associated with Transboundary mining.


NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.

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