National Fisherman

Late August 2007 — During the second humpy opening with Davis and Mike, Davis asked why my boom was lashed to my mast. I showed him my coil of rigging line and the box of blocks, and told him I haven't had the time to get the thing rigged up. He couldn't believe I had the stuff for over a year and still haven't gotten around to the job. I had to explain that right now the wife and kids trump my "vacation" fishing boat on time allocation.

Davis loved messing with rigging. It was all I could do to stop him from doing it right then and there. He just about had me talked into doing it, but after that morning's near-death incident with the orca whale, I could only picture my loose mast swinging wildly to and fro while I'm trying to haul my gillnet aboard for some odd, panicked reason. I told him we could do it sometime while we were tied to the dock.

Sure enough, a couple days after the opening, Davis was calling me up ready to rig the Satisfaction, so I met him down at the dock and we went to work. When I bought the boat it already had a couple of Harkin single blocks. I could never figure out how he planned on rigging the boom, so I bought a couple additional double blocks to pair with the singles on the side-stays, and a triple block for up top on the mast. I essentially rigged it just like a miniature seiner, except there was no need to have so much pulling power on my boat.

Davis was like a kid in a candy shop with that rigging. Although he is quite fit and spry, he is still an old-timer, so I did all the climbing and mousing of the blocks on the mast and the boom. In less than a couple hours the whole job was done.

Next I pulled out my Warn light-duty electric winch and showed him where I wanted to mount it onto the boom. Davis had figured we were done, and I could tell his head was moving in that direction, but after tripping over these projects for a year, I wanted to get them done all in one fell swoop.

So Davis held the winch in position while I drilled the holes and bolted it in place. Then we rigged up a snatch block on the boom through which to thread the lifting cable. Davis helped me thread the wires to the power source, and — voila — my winch was done! Its funny how the Satisfaction gets its work completed in spontaneous, unplanned bursts of productivity. As long at there's somebody willing to help, I'm up for getting the job done.

Does anybody out there know how to fix an old Bainbridge autopilot?


Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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