National Fisherman

July 10-11, 2007 — By the end of Tuesday, July 10, there was scarcely a current to be had; one by one everything started fading out, especially after it got dark because I ran my deck lights. First the cell phone went, then the radios. Every light was dim, even after I quit running the deck lights; the cabin lights were less than the glow of a match. When the GPS faded away, I knew it was time to do something about this situation.

I quit fishing while it was still flooding, this time not even close to catching the limit. I put fresh batteries into my handheld GPS so I could still navigate into the river, and ran for camp. I arrived at high water and grabbed two new batteries out of the parts room. I also grabbed the battery tester, and fed upon the battery boneyard like a vulture, finding batteries with signs of life and bringing the three best along for the ride as sacrifices to the battery gods. I headed back into the night with all lights out to conserve the juice.

While fishing the flood on the next opening on Wednesday, July 11, I got word my alternator had arrived and was heading out on a tender. I hooked up with the tender that evening, just as my supply of sacrificial batteries was depleted. I was praying the whole time that it would all come together, because I was just about at the end of my rope after dealing with this alternator crap.

The engineer on the tender was a huge help in pressing a part into the new (actually it was used and corroded) bracket. I was extra-careful because I knew I couldn't take any more of this battery b.s. and missed fishing time. When it all came together, my prayers were answered; the boat fired up and the alternator charged! We lightened our load by leaving on the tender three dead batteries, a generator, and two empty jugs of gas.

I suppose this story has a happy ending, but I cannot find it. I know I'm not supposed to dwell on the fact that this guy and his stupid engine he slapped together probably cost me 20,000 pounds of fish in lost fishing time. Nor should I concern myself with the fact that when I was finally back up and running and fishing with a clear head, the run had tapered down and we were pretty much scratch fishing for the remainder of the season.

On the bright side, my boat now has the correct alternator, and at the end of the season I even ordered a correct spare for the engine so I will never have to go through that experience again. Yippee!

TO BE CONTINUED...

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

It is with great sadness that Furuno USA announced the passing of industry veteran and long-time Furuno employee, Ed Davis, on April 30.
Read more...

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is required by state statute to appoint someone to the Board of Fisheries by today, Tuesday, May 19. However, his efforts to fill the seat have gone unfulfilled since he took office in January. The seven-member board serves as an in-state fishery management council for fisheries in state waters.

The resignation of Walker’s director of Boards and Commissions, Karen Gillis, fanned the flames of controversy late last week.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email