National Fisherman

Peak of the Run, 2008 — Along with Madeline came Bruce, the Chaperone. Bruce is a great guy and a really good hand because he is always looking for something to do and does things that really help. But I was a bit concerned about his request to spend a few days on the boat during the peak of the run, because it's not like there is any extra room on my boat. But that was the arrangement we had for him escorting Madeline up, so that's what we were going to do.

We were already a crew of four on my little wood boat. Dave had built an extra sleeping berth in the preseason, and I cut away a bit of the cabinetry by the floor so we could even sleep five in a horizontal, fore-aft position when Madeline was on the boat, but Bruce made it SIX on board. Fortunately, he was happy to sleep on the dashboard bunk, which I cannot handle when the boat is rocking side to side, just as it does when we are anchored up on Johnson Hill or anywhere else outside for that matter.

Looking at us all on deck must have been a quite comical. There we were, six people, all living and working on a wooden Bristol Bay gillnetter that was originally built to house only two. Most fishing boats in Alaska — seiners, tenders, and gillnetters alike — had fewer people aboard!

When we hauled the net, there were two guys on either side as it was reeled aboard on the drum, and two people up on the flying bridge watching. It was kind of handy during heavy fishing, but it was pretty boring most of the time up there on the flying bridge, and there was hardly room on deck for me to pick even if I wanted to.

What really amazed me was that although there were six of us aboard, it wasn't any more crowded than with four. An unspoken systematic order evolved, where we each got our shit together and cleared out of the way, and then the next guy did the same. We were working hard, so all we wanted was to get our deck gear off, eat, get comfortable, and go to sleep. Even Madeline worked with this groove, as she was just there like a fly on the wall.

I usually do most of the cooking, but Bruce likes to cook as well, so he grabbed the helm of the propane stove and whipped up some tasty treats. It was nice to have a variety in the way our only food, fresh sockeye salmon, was cooked. And it was nice for me not to have to worry about cooking it.

What I expected to last just a day or two lasted an entire week, which was the full amount of time Bruce could spend on the boat before he had to catch his plane back home. And after he left, we kind of missed having him around. He cooked, he cleaned the deck automatically, he was there to set and haul the anchor, and aside from all this great stuff, he was just great to have around.

It was really an amazing feat to have us all sardined on that boat for so long, and for us all to be so happy about it. It just goes to show that we had some good ju-ju going on the Sunlight III in 2008.

TO BE CONTINUED...

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
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