National Fisherman

At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

Monday, October 24, 2011 — It was a busy week for me, and finally a week with fish!

I left San Juan Island on Monday evening, traveled to Seattle (Fishermen's Terminal), then ran the Satisfaction 4 hours at 8 knots to Hood Canal. Linda, again, was my crew, and we found a mooring buoy around 3 a.m.

We started fishing at 7 a.m. and had close to a couple hundred fish for the day, most of which were caught in the morning. I left before the change-of-light set, which is always good when gillnetting salmon, to run for the fishing in Seattle's Area 10, which started at 5 p.m. Seattle fishing turned out to be rather slow, with only 50 or so fish for my efforts, which ended at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 26.

I was right back at it on Wednesday night, running to Hood Canal to make the Thursday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. opening. This time I fished the whole period, which was a good thing because I had a nice change-of-
light set of 80 fish for a quick hour (total time) in the water. I could have let that set go a bit longer before the closure, but I (and my gear) would probably have drifted into the Hood Canal Floating Bridge on the ebb current, which is NEVER a good thing.

Again, I headed over to the Seattle side, a three-hour run, and wrapped up the fishing over there for another 45 fish.

Still scratchy in Seattle, but decent fish showing in the canal, it had been an exhausting week of no sleep, but with reward of fish.


Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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