National Fisherman

At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 — We left Sitka in a hurry after an 8-hour turnaround at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 27, and headed out across the Gulf of Alaska to fish for halibut and blackcod in the 3A (halibut) and CG (Central Gulf blackcod) regions (the areas overlap). The weather was very nice running across, so baiting up was easy and enjoyable. We baited all our gear, then started fishing upon our arrival at the halibut grounds in the Seward Gully on Thursday morning.

Halibut fishing was good, but as planned we fished only one day of halibut, then shifted to blackcod for Friday and Saturday. The whales joined us while we were hauling, and helped us out with a few of the big ones. I made up a rhyme about the whales, "We feed 'em, and the Japanese EAT 'em!"

We cut our trip short a day because the ice we got in Sitka wasn't very cold, and was melting away in the hatch. That was the story from George, who was the one who put the ice into the hatch. It didn't matter; the decision to deliver had been made, so that is what we would do. We baited up a string on the haul-back to reduce our in-town time when we delivered.

The delivery crew was waiting for us at Resurrection Bay Seafoods' dock, first thing on Sunday, April 1. We baited gear while we were delivering, then we flushed out our hatch, took ice, I got a few groceries, and we were outta there by 4 p.m. If it didn't actually happen, I'd have said it was an April Fool's day joke; an 8-hour turnaround is fast, and this was the second one of the season… back to back!

So we were off again, hoping to enjoy nice weather and good fishing in the Gulf of Alaska!


Inside the Industry

Pink shrimp is the first fishery managed by Washington to receive certification from the global Marine Stewardship Council fisheries standard for sustainable, wild-caught seafood.

The state’s fishery was independently assessed as a scope extension of the MSC certified Oregon pink shrimp fishery, which achieved certification to the MSC standard in December 2007 and attained recertification in February 2013.


NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.

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