National Fisherman

At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

March 21 to April 3, 2007 — The Discovery arrived in Sitka in the wee hours of the morning on Wednesday, March 21. We tied directly to the Seafood Producers Cooperative dock and awaited delivery of our first trip of the year. They started off-loading us around 10 a.m., and we had everything wrapped up in just a few hours. All totaled, we had nearly 20,000 pounds of fish aboard, which was pretty good considering we fished only one day.

Baiting halibut gear was our primary task on Thursday, March 22. On Friday we baited what remained of the blackcod gear, and left for fishing at 5 p.m.

On the run out, George once again brought talk of a big storm, but Chicken Little held no clout this time, and we made it out to the grounds and set our gear without rearranging our schedule. As it turned out, the weather was nice as anyone could ask for.

We fished one day of halibut and two days of blackcod, and caught our entire quota for both species. We had the gear aboard and the boat scrubbed down by 9 p.m. on Monday, March 27, which brought the Discovery to the dock at 1 a.m. on Tuesday.

Unfortunately for the cavity-infested children, but fortunately for a few rockfish, our catch of rockfish was very low, so Fish for Teeth had no fish donated to it after this opening. Besides, the herring purse seine fleet was in, and the plant was backed up with herring, so there was no time to dress fish for the children, anyway.

We did nothing on Tuesday; I guess it was a day off. We baited on Wednesday, then took ice at 6 a.m. on Thursday, and left promptly at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 29. We were heading across the Gulf of Alaska, to catch halibut and black cod in the central gulf area. It is a two-day run across, and then we had four days of fishing ahead of us.

The weather was really nice with a gentle southeast wind encouraging us along in our crossing of the Gulf of Alaska. We arrived on the fishing grounds in the Seward Gully in the wee hours of Saturday morning, March 31. We laid out one halibut string in the dark, and followed it up with three more after daybreak. Then we ran to nearby deeper waters and slapped out a couple blackcod strings for a long soak.

We hauled halibut gear all day that first day, and one more string in the morning of Sunday, April 1. We had 18,000 pounds of halibut from those four strings, which was not red-hot fishing, but we weren't complaining. After the halibut we went immediately to hauling blackcod gear, which we continued to do for the following two and a half days.

We averaged 4,000 pounds of blackcod per string, which everyone aboard was quite happy with. Since we were bringing the fish aboard round (uncleaned), we could hold the fish aboard the boat for only three days. But that was fine with us, because dressing fish is a lot of work; we used to stay out for seven or eight days, scratching away and cleaning every fish.

We had the last string aboard on Tuesday evening, and 10 hours later we were tied to the Resurrection Bay Seafoods dock, waiting to deliver.

TO BE CONTINUED...

National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

SeaShare, a non-profit organization that facilitates donations of seafood to feed the hungry, announced on Wednesday, July 29 that it had partnered up with Alaska seafood companies, freight companies and the Coast Guard, to coordinate the donation and delivery of 21,000 pounds of halibut to remote villages in western Alaska. 

On Wednesday, the Coast Guard loaded 21,000 pounds of donated halibut on its C130 airplane in Kodiak and made the 634-mile flight to Nome.

Read more...

The New England Fishery Management Council  is soliciting applications for seats on the Northeast Trawl Survey Advisory Panel and the deadline to apply is July 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The panel will consist of 16 members including members of the councils and the Atlantic States Fishery Commission, industry experts, non-federal scientists and Northeast Fisheries Science Center scientists. Panel members are expected to serve for three years.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email