National Fisherman


At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

March 2007 — As the Discovery ran north from Bellingham, we stopped in Petersburg on Saturday night to get ice, but we had to wait until the fish plant opened in the morning. With nothing better to do, we went out for a few drinks at the bar.

On a cold night in March, albeit a Saturday night, there is not much going on in Petersburg. We wound up doing what we usually do — sitting around and looking at each other as we supported the local economy by drinking expensive booze.

As we sat and looked, we were joined by a burley fellow in a watch cap and a black t-shirt. He was vague on what he was doing in Petersburg, but he was here, that was for certain. He had a goofy East Coast accent, like some guys I know in Bristol Bay, so I figured he might be from where they were from.

"So, are you from Gloucester?" I asked.

"YEA!" He replied excitedly, "I'm from Gloucester!"

Immediately he started ranting about life in Gloucester, Mass., and how the movie The Perfect Storm did such a great job of portraying such a life. He talked about the bar in the movie, and told of many an hour spent there, living life much as it had been shown in the movie.

By this time we all realized this guy was completely full of shit, but looking at him was much more interesting than looking at each other, so we hung on his every word. Next he shifted to his fishing exploits.

He said he had gone fishing on a big boat, like the one in the movie, but he couldn't remember what kind of fishing he had done. But the guys were tough — real tough; and The Perfect Storm did a good job portraying fishing life. We did get him to admit the part with the shark chomping down on the guy's leg was a bit phony...

Next he started talking about another fishery had had done. "I was fishin' out of Gloucester," he began, "fishin' for those... those..." he glanced around, trying to rejoin a long disconnected synapse, "...you know, those RED things — with the PINCHAS!"

"Lobster?" I asked, hoping that wasn't the answer.

"YEA! LOBSTA!" He smiled broadly, and continued his story. "So I was fishin' for lobsta. And we was fishin' in the shallows. And I was throwin' the traps ova, and I got a hook stuck in my aam (arm) RIGHT HERE!" He pointed to the outside of his shoulder. What kind of "hook" got stuck in his arm, I had no idea. We just let him go with his story...

"So the trap took me ovaboard," he continued, "it took me DOWN." He looked at us to see if we were with him; we were — he was now underwater with a lobsta trap hooked to his aam.

"But we was fishin' in shallow watta — ten feet deep. Now, I had a buddy who fell ova in shallow watta, and he didn't make it — he drowned." He looked at us solemnly; we understood. "He tried fightin' the trap on the way down — he didn't make it.

"Now what I did — I was smart. I let the trap take me down — all the way down. It was only ten feet deep, so I went to the BOTTOM." He looked at us; we were with him — on the bottom. "THEN, when I was on the bottom, THAT'S when I took the hook outta my aam. I didn't fight it, and it came right out — I WAITED, I went to the bottom, and I MADE it!"

TO BE CONTINUED...

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
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