National Fisherman

At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

June 25, 2011 — As I write this I have just returned from two openings in Egegik. We can fish in any East Side district through June 24, so I took in a couple of openings down there, where the fish come a couple days before Naknek. It was good fishing, and I made two openings there, and only missed one Naknek opening. I am now registered in Naknek, where I will spend the remainder of the season.

At this point the boat seems ready to roll; all of our projects have been accomplished. The crew is acclimated to boat life and ready for the season. Tomorrow my daughter Madeline comes in to join us for the remainder of the season. That will give us a crew of four, plus me as the skipper, for a total of five on board my old-school high-tech wood boat.

We started out our season fishing in Naknek doing an array of drills to teach Linda, the new deckhand, the way the deck works. Linda is my wife Maureen's trusted friend; she is a hard worker and has a great attitude. I opted for the hard-working-greenhorn-gal to supplement my fifteen-year-old daughter, so with those two gals and my two other regular crew, Edward and Anthony, the Sunlight III back deck will be a force to be reckoned with. I refer to my deck as the octopus because there are eight hands ready to pull the fish out of the net.

At this point the season is upon us. It is time to go fishing for the long grind. We are expecting to be fishing two tides per day, and going for it for all it is worth. The Bristol Bay season is short, and we have to give it our all. We are ready for that now.


Inside the Industry

The Northeast Fisheries Science Center has announced that Dr. Jon Hare has been selected to serve as the permanent science and research director effective Oct. 31.

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It’s no secret that fraud is a problem in the seafood industry. Oceana repeatedly touts a mislabeling epidemic. While their method has been criticized, the perception of rampant fraud  has been established.

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