National Fisherman

At Sea Diary

Matt MarinkovichMatt Marinkovich’s weekly At Sea Diary entry is a popular feature of the National Fisherman Web site, and now you can post your own reflections on Matt’s experiences fishing in the Pacific Northwest and North Pacific.

September 18, 2011 — The newly revamped, now 21-foot open gillnet skiff Lady Ruth paid a few of its bills on the third week of the silver fishery in Bellingham Bay. The fishery reopened after a two-day closure on Sunday, September 18. It was a blustery day as the southerly wind swept the swell onto the flats of the northern shore of Bellingham Bay. With Linda as my faithful crew member, I arrived 10 minutes before the 7 a.m. opening time, found my spot, and slapped it out on the flats near the mouth of the Nooksak River.

I had a couple silvers hit the net before I had finished setting. The wind was blowing something fierce, and it really kicked up a swell on the beach. We very cautiously picked the fish out as they hit; 15 the first pass, more than 10 the second, and about 10 more the third. We dressed the fish after each pass, and didn't actually pick the net up until the tide dropped out from under us later in the afternoon. We kept at it the whole day, and had about 80 fish for our efforts, all of which were sold on San Juan Island.

The highlights of the Bellingham skiff fishing were when I lost the anchor — TWICE — because of my own stupidity. I didn't tie the end off, even after Linda suggested it.

We had a tense moment when Linda fell overboard. She was knocked over the rail after being on the wrong side of the long net hook. I was a bit freaked because that skiff isn't very maneuverable, especially in the wind; when I looked over the rail I was relieved to see Linda standing there, looking up at me amongst the breakers. We were fishing in only 3 feet of water).


Inside the Industry

NMFS has awarded 16 grants totaling more than $2.5 million as part of its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program.

The program supports the development of technological solutions and changes in fishing practices designed to minimize bycatch and aims to to find creative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch, seabird interactions, and post-release mortality in federally managed fisheries.


Abe Williams, who was elected to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association board last spring, has been selected as the new president as of September.

Williams fishes the F/V Crimson Fury, and is president of Nuna Resources, a nonprofit that supports sustainable resource development in rural Alaska, including fighting for an international solution to issues raised by the proposed Pebble Mine project.

Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
U.S. Canada Other

Postal/ Zip Code
© 2015 Diversified Business Communications
Diversified Business Communications