National Fisherman

National Fisherman - April 2009


Look lively on watch

Fishing regulations — even those intended to reduce hazards to the fleet — often result in quick turnarounds at the dock on top of long days and nights setting and hauling gear. Adequate sleep is hard to come by for any crew member on any fishing boat, but fatigue and inexperience are two especially deadly factors when it comes to standing watch.


Year in Review


Squid shines as lobster prices tank, crab stocks dip, surf clam fleet shrinks

Maine's coastal economy has been likened to furniture: a stool losing its legs as groundfish, herring and other fisheries get more restrictive. The breathtaking autumn 2008 dive in lobster prices threatened to kick out the last leg.


A tale of two councils

If I had a dollar for every time the North Pacific council was offered up as fishing's example of the Truth, the Way and the Light, I'd be writing this from my winter home on Kauai.


2008 Year in Review

A-changin' times

Individual fishing quotas have been around a long time: We've been discussing them — arguing about them, resisting them, and ultimately embracing them — for more than a decade.



Lobster boat picks up 7 feet; 30-footer has plenty of speed

In late November, a lengthening job on a 50-foot Wesmac lobster boat was completed at Finestkind Boatyard in South Harpswell, Maine. Tommy Clemons wanted 7 feet added to his lobster boat, the Obsession, to "make the boat run a little better. Before it was a little bit bow up," says the boatyard's Mark Hubbard.


Inside the Industry

NMFS recently released a draft action plan for fish discard and release mortality science, creating a list of actions that they hope can better inform fisheries.

We know that fishermen have to deal with bycatch by discarding or releasing unwanted catch overboard, but there is a data gap regarding how those fish survive.


A new study has identified a set of features common to all ocean ecosystems that provide a visual diagnosis of the health of the underwater environment coastal communities rely on.

Together, the features detail cumulative effects of threats -- such as overfishing, pollution, and invasive species,  allowing responders to act faster to increase ocean resiliency and sustainability.

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