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Ever looked at a lobster tail and thought, “This would taste better eaten like a popsicle”? Now all your lob-pop dreams can to come true. Lobster ME, a fast-casual, Las Vegas seafood restaurant, is coming to Bethesda in October.

The signature “lobsicle” involves a Maine tail that’s either grilled or deep-fried; a History Channel YouTube review dubs it “the world’s most perfect food.”

Read the full story at The Washingtonian>>

Want to read more about unique lobster recipes? Click here...

The Loud Hailer

Drill conductor course in Kodiak

AMSEAStandardLogoThe Alaska Marine Safety Education Association is offering a 10-hour course for commercial fishermen this weekend. The course meets U.S. Coast Guard drill conductor requirements for fishing vessels and contains an in-the-water practice session.

 

Instructors will cover cold water survival skills, firefighting, emergency drills and other at-sea emergency training.

 

When:
May 27-28

 

Where:
KSMSC - 118 Trident Way
Kodiak, Alaska

 

This workshop is free to commercial fishermen. You can register online.


Understanding oil spills

GOMA-logoNext month, the Gulf of Mexico Alliance is a hosting a seminar to help industry leaders better understand oil spills and the aftermath.

 

 

Topics will include impacts to water resources, habitats, wildlife and fisheries, and coastal resilience. Oil spill science educational resources and access to raw data and publications will also be shared. 

 

 

Presenters include  representatives from Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, Florida Sea Grant, Louisiana Sea Grant and Texas Sea Grant

 

When:

Tuesday, June 14 — 2:00 to 4:00pm

 

Where: Louisiana room Hilton Capital Center 201 Lafayette St, Baton Rouge, LA

 

For more information and to register, visit the event website.

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.

Recipes

16 Crepe CrevettesDownload a printable recipe cardIt’s possible that this salad would be just as delicious without a crepe underneath. But that’s the way I first tried it at one of my favorite Wharf Street holes in the wall, a French place called the Merry Table. Their speciality was crepes and other simple French foods.

Crevettes is French for shrimp, a much more elegant name for one of the world’s most popular ocean delights. You can cook it almost any way and end up with something tasty. For this dish, full of fresh, summery flavors, I chose to oil poach the shrimp. Before you roll your eyes at the thought, I beg you to try it. If you love fresh shrimp, this cooking method will knock your socks off by preserving the flavor of the shrimp. I use the cooking oil to make my dressing, so there’s no waste.

For this, I used South Atlantic white shrimp. I had to shell and clean them, but the results were well worth it. The ingredients may seem odd together — crepes, shrimp, guacamole, asparagus, vinaigrette. But for me this dish is much more than the sum of its parts. The Merry Table is no more, but this dish will live on.

Serves 4

Ingredients2016 0526 17 Crevettes

1/2 pound fresh wild shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 cup olive oil
5 ounces mixed greens
1 pound asparagus
8 cherry or Campari tomatoes
4 crepes — I follow Alton Brown’s recipe
Guacamole (recipe below)
Dijon vinaigrette (recipe below)

Preparation

Most crepe recipes require time for the batter to rest. Be sure to build in this time.

Trim and steam asparagus until just tender (just 2-3 minutes), then refrigerate. Ever get down to the end of a spear of asparagus and find that it’s too tough to chew? Instead of cutting off the ends, try snapping each one at the natural breaking point.

To a small saucepan, add your shrimp and enough olive oil to cover (I use about a cup). Cook over low heat until the shrimp is white but not tough, about 10 minutes. Remove from oil and slice lengthwise.

In the meantime, rinse your greens, slice your tomatoes, plate your crepes and prepare your guacamole and dressing. The crepes are fine served at room temperature for this meal.

Toss your greens lightly in the dressing. Divide them evenly among your plates, then top with guacamole, tomatoes and shrimp. Lay the asparagus over the top and drizzle with a little more dressing.

Guacamole

Ingredients

3 avocados
4 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1/4 cup fresh lime and/or lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

Allow the garlic to soak in the lime juice for 20-30 minutes. Add chopped avocados and mash to combine.

Dijon vinaigrette

Ingredients

1 cup poaching oil
1/2 cup white wine vinegar
1 shallot, chopped roughly
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
Optional teaspoon of mayonnaise

Preparation

Blend ingredients until frothy. Salt and pepper to taste.


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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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Inside the Industry

Legislators from Connecticut and Massachusetts complained about the current “out-of-date allocation formula” in black sea bass, summer flounder and scup fisheries in a letter to the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this week.

Read more...

The Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s Alliance recently announced that the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation has awarded the organization a Hollings Grant to reduce whale entanglements in Alaska salmon fisheries by increasing the use of acoustic whale pingers to minimize entanglements in fishing gear.

Read more...

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