National Fisherman

UMass Dartmouth marine scientists say they have documented a major increase in the scallop population on Georges Bank.

A video-based survey conducted by the School for Marine Science and Technology over nine weeks showed a 32 percent increase in the scallop population since 2012. That's an increase in scallop meat weight from 243 million pounds two years ago to 320 million pounds this summer.

"We are really excited about this," said Department of Fisheries Oceanography Chair Kevin Stokesbury.

On average, U.S. scallop stock is made up of 8 billion individual shellfish. This study discovered 20 billion additional juvenile scallops in the Nantucket Lightship and along the Southern flank of Georges Bank.

The scallops have not yet matured to commercial size, something Stokesbury said will help sustain the fishery for the next decade.

Read the full story at South Coast Today>>

Want to read more about Georges Bank scallops? Click here...

The Loud Hailer

NFMS to present on rebuilding Maine stocks

2015 0902 ITI merrickDr. Richard Merrick. GMRI promotional photo.The Gulf of Maine Research Institute will be hosting Richard Merrick, the chief science advisor and director of science programs for NFMS, next week for a presentation on NOAA’s strategies for rebuilding fish stocks.

 

The presentation is titled "Good News from the Gulf of Maine" and is the first lecture in GMRI’s fall Joan M. Kelly Sea State lecture series.

 

The institute notes that NOAA has been successful since the mid 1970s in rebuilding and recovering numerous species under the Magnuson Stevens Act, Marine Mammal Protected Act and Endangered Species Act, but that the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems has created obstacles for some species.

 

The recovery of some species has also produced unintended consequences resulting from their impacts on ecosystems, other listed species, and the communities dependent upon them.

 

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited. You can register online.

 

When:

Sept. 10, 7-8 p.m.

 

Where:

Gulf of Maine Research Institute

350 Commercial Street

Portland, ME 04101


Coast Guard examination deadlines are coming up


CoastGuard LogoThe deadline to make sure your vessel is up to Coast Guard requirements is coming up next month.

 

Mandatory dockside safety examinations are required for certain fishing vessels starting Oct. 15.

 

You are required to successfully complete a dockside safety examination if you fish outside 3 nautical miles from shore, if you carry more than 16 individuals onboard, regardless of where you operate, or if you are engaged in the Aleutian Trade. Vessels that pass will be issued a safety decal.

 

If you have previously had your vessel examined after Jan. 1, 2013, you are not required to have your vessel reexamined until fine years after the date that the decal was issued. The Coast Guard is recommending reexamination to show compliance with current requirements regardless, but it is not required.

 

If your vessel is boarded by the Coast Guard and you are not in full compliance with the regulations, you may be subject to enforcement action, penalties, termination of the vessel’s voyage or other operational controls.

 

To schedule an examination or for more information, contact your local Coast Guard sector and ask for the local fishing vessel safety examiner.

 

Recipes

Eric Haynes’ Cod Cakes

  • 2 pounds 8-oz cod fillets, fresh if available
  • 4 ounces fresh bread crumbs
  • 2 ounces onion, diced fine
  • 1 ounces celery, diced fine
  • 1 ounces red bell pepper, diced fine
  • 1 ounces green bell pepper, diced fine
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
  • Cooking oil or clarified butter as needed
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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has scheduled a series of scoping hearings to gather public input for a proposed action to protect unmanaged forage species.

The proposed action would consider a prohibition on the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries on unmanaged forage species in the Mid-Atlantic until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.

Read more...

The National Marine Educators Association has partnered with NOAA this year to offer all NMEA 2015 conference attendees an educational session on how free NOAA data can add functionality to navigation systems and maritime apps.

Session topics include nautical charts, tides and currents, seafloor data, buoy networking and weather, among others.

Read more...
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