National Fisherman

UMass Dartmouth marine scientists say they have documented a major increase in the scallop population on Georges Bank.

A video-based survey conducted by the School for Marine Science and Technology over nine weeks showed a 32 percent increase in the scallop population since 2012. That's an increase in scallop meat weight from 243 million pounds two years ago to 320 million pounds this summer.

"We are really excited about this," said Department of Fisheries Oceanography Chair Kevin Stokesbury.

On average, U.S. scallop stock is made up of 8 billion individual shellfish. This study discovered 20 billion additional juvenile scallops in the Nantucket Lightship and along the Southern flank of Georges Bank.

The scallops have not yet matured to commercial size, something Stokesbury said will help sustain the fishery for the next decade.

Read the full story at South Coast Today>>

Want to read more about Georges Bank scallops? Click here...

The Loud Hailer

Support your salmon fishermen!
 
2015 0625 LoudHailer CFBBNaknek River on Alaska's Bristol Bay. Chris Miller photoThis shot of Naknek from photographer Chris Miller shows some of Alaska’s Bristol Bay netters getting ready for a possible record season, which is expected to open this week.

In the off-season, some of those same fishermen toured the country on the #eatwildsavewild tour with “The Breach” filmmaker Mark Titus, Seattle Chef Tom Douglas, Vital Choice Wild Seafood and Organics, Trout Unlimited and United Tribes of Bristol Bay.

If you haven’t seen the film yet, you can rent or buy it here. Twenty percent of the proceeds go to the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association to help fund its efforts to protect and sustain Bristol Bay's salmon fishery.

You can also support Bristol Bay salmon fishermen by buying their sockeye. Check out the BBRSDA’s list of direct marketers, processors and retailers.
 

Submit comments on Magnuson standards
 
2015 LoudHailer 0616 NMFSNMFS has issued a proposed rule to revise the general section of the National Standard guidelines and those for National Standards 1, 3 and 7 of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act.

This proposed rule is primarily focused on revising the National Standard 1 guidelines. However, revisions to the National Standard 3 and 7 guidelines are also proposed to address the important issue of identifying stocks that require conservation and management. The proposed revisions do not establish new requirements or require councils to revise their current fishery management plans. They provide additional clarity and potential flexibility in meeting current Magnuson-Stevens Act mandates.

The general section describes the purpose of the guidelines, the importance of identifying fishery management objectives, and defines terms that are used throughout the National Standard guidelines.

The National Standard 1 guidelines provide guidance on preventing overfishing while achieving the optimum yield from each U.S. fishery.

The National Standard 3 guidelines provide guidance on managing a stock as a unit throughout its range.

The National Standard 7 guidelines address minimizing costs and avoiding duplication in fisheries management.

The proposed revisions include:
  • Increasing flexibility in setting timelines for rebuilding programs.
  • Providing flexibility for better managing data-limited stocks.
  • Clarifying guidance on which stocks require conservation and management.
  • Enhancing current efforts by the councils to apply ecosystem approaches to management.
  • Providing for more stable fisheries through guidance on multiyear overfishing determinations, phasing in results of new stock assessments, and the carryover of the unused portion of annual catch limits to subsequent years.
  • Adding a definition for "depleted stocks" to recognize non-fishing-related impacts to fish stocks.
  • Recommending the councils re-evaluate the objectives of fishery management plans, to ensure they reflect the changing needs of the fishery, including allocation of fishery resources.
Submit your comments by June 30. For more information, visit the NMFS site.

Recipes

Eric Haynes’ Cod Cakes

  • 2 pounds 8-oz cod fillets, fresh if available
  • 4 ounces fresh bread crumbs
  • 2 ounces onion, diced fine
  • 1 ounces celery, diced fine
  • 1 ounces red bell pepper, diced fine
  • 1 ounces green bell pepper, diced fine
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
  • Cooking oil or clarified butter as needed
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Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 3/10/15

In this episode, Online Editor Leslie Taylor talks with Mike McLouglin, vice president of Dunlop Industrial and Protective Footwear.

National Fisherman Live: 2/24/15

In this episode:

March date set for disaster aid dispersal
Oregon LNG project could disrupt fishing
NOAA tweaks gear marking requirement
N.C. launches first commercial/recreational dock
Spiny lobster traps limits not well received

Inside the Industry

ANCHORAGE, AK – Coastal Villages Region Fund has reached an agreement with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to help fund its fisheries research activities in Western Alaska this summer. The fund will provide up to $92,152 to support the operation of weirs on the Goodnews Bay and Kanektok rivers.

Read more...

The U.S. Commerce Department announced the appointment of 30 new and returning members to the eight regional fishery management councils that partner with NMFS to manage ocean fish stocks. The new and reappointed council members begin their three-year terms on Aug. 11.

Each year, the Secretary of Commerce appoints approximately one-third of the total 72 appointed members to the eight regional councils. The secretary selects members from nominations submitted by the governors of fishing states, territories and tribal governments.

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