National Fisherman

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce has declared the Fraser River sockeye salmon run a “fishery disaster” for nine tribes and non-tribal fishers in Washington state.


The Fraser River empties out near Vancouver, British Columbia. The sockeye salmon from that river are a key resource for the state and tribal fishing industries in Washington.

The Fraser River sockeye salmon runs are worth more than $4 million each year, and they’ve been in decline for 30 years. The fishery was closed altogether in 2013.

Fisheries managers blame the decline on poor ocean conditions, warm river temperatures and habitat decline, among other things.

Tuesday's disaster declaration empowers Congress to allocate money for fishermen and fishing communities that are affected by the crash.

Read the full story at KUOW>>

The Loud Hailer

Wash., Ore. seek advisory group nominations

 

wdfw logo 03-15-11Washington and Oregon fishery managers are seeking candidates to fill positions on advisory committees that provide guidance on recreational and commercial fishing issues on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

 

The two states' fish and wildlife departments are accepting nominations to their joint advisory groups for Columbia River recreational and commercial fisheries through Friday, Nov. 14. The two groups meet three to four times per year to develop recommendations for salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and smelt fisheries.

 

Members are also expected to provide comments on issues addressed in the season-setting process for the North of Falcon salmon fisheries, as well as for Columbia River Compact commercial fishing hearings and joint state hearings on sportfishing policies.

 

"Advisory group members provide an important voice for the fishing public," says Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. "We're looking for candidates who can fill that essential role."

 

Up to 16 candidates will be chosen for each advisory group, which together represent all aspects of the Northwest fishing industry, Roler says.

 

Any group or individual may submit a nomination. Nominations should include a resume with contact information and a statement that describes the nominee's fishing experience, interest in serving on the committee and ability to communicate with regional constituents.

 

Mail nominations to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2108 Grand Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98661. You can also fax nominations to the department at (360) 906-6776, or email them to TeamVancouver@dfw.wa.gov.

 

For more information on nominations to the commercial fishing advisory group, visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/about/advisory/nominations/columbia_river_comm.pdf.

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Recipes

Eric Haynes’ Cod Cakes

  • 2 pounds 8-oz cod fillets, fresh if available
  • 4 ounces fresh bread crumbs
  • 2 ounces onion, diced fine
  • 1 ounces celery, diced fine
  • 1 ounces red bell pepper, diced fine
  • 1 ounces green bell pepper, diced fine
  • 2 tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Tabasco
  • Cooking oil or clarified butter as needed
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Book Reviews

2014 902 Of Sea and CloudOf Sea and Clouds
By Jon Keller
Tyrus Books, 2014
Hardcover, 336 pp., $24.99
http://www.tyrusbooks.com/books/of-sea-and-cloud

Maine's lobster fishery is apparently fertile ground for novelists. Not so long ago, I reviewed "Vacationland" by Nat Goodale, which was an enjoyable read. "Of Sea and Cloud" by Jon Keller, also set in the Pine Tree State's most profitable fishery, is a darker ride, but no less of a page-turner.

Things get ugly in a hurry. Nicholas Graves has raised his sons, Bill and Joshua (known as Jonah), to be lobstermen. But when Nicholas is lost at sea, the mystery of his death sparks a chain of events resulting in a war between the Graves boys and Osmond Randolph, a lobsterman and former Calvinist minister, as well as their father's business partner for more than 20 years.

With Nicholas out of the picture, the powerful and unsettling Osmond, aided by his grandson and heir, Julius (a deeply unsettling guy in his own right), moves to push the Graves family out of the lobster pound Nicholas and Osmond ran at any cost. A trap war develops as Osmond sets lobster traps on the Graves family grounds mere days after Nicholas is lost at sea.

Jonah cuts about $5,000-worth of Osmond's traps. In retaliation, Julius sets his gear directly on top of the Graves' traps. And as the Graves try to figure out what happened to their father the war escalates from there.

But the story isn't solely about an ugly trap war. Keller worked aboard a Down-East Maine lobster boat for several years after graduate school, and during that time, he said in a Tyrus Books interview, he "began to see within the land and people something nearing on the epic."

"When I started writing 'Of Sea and Cloud,' I fell immediately into a voice that felt to me to echo this epic starkness — and more importantly than echoing, I hoped that the voice would resonate in and through the novel in the way the coastal landscape resonates in and through the Down-East world," he explained.

Keller said he he's lived in enough small towns to be aware of when a place is undergoing a serious shift.

"I'd call it a cultural unraveling, perhaps, and it results in loneliness and desperation that I hoped to capture in the book," he said. "It's the confusion that results when a sub-culture doesn't evolve as quickly as the culture that surrounds it. The technology has changed, the standards of living have changed, the world has changed... yet the way of life has not, and the result is a cultural tailspin, a potential breakdown."

Furthermore, Keller said the region's isolation doesn't protect it from a changing world as much as it exposes it. In the book, Osmond sees that global markets are going to affect the lobster industry and the aging lobsterman is desperate to protect his family and ensure that they will survive those changes.

Keller says "Of Sea and Cloud" is "a book that asks something of the reader, just as the coast of Maine asks something of those who inhabit it." It's a story that should be food for thought for 21st century fishermen, be they veteran harvesters or young bucks trying to make their mark on this historic industry.


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National Fisherman Live

National Fisherman Live: 10/7/14

In this episode, National Fisherman Publisher Jerry Fraser talks about the 1929 dragger Vandal.

National Fisherman Live: 9/23/14

In this episode:

'Injection' plan to save fall run salmon
Proposed fishing rule to protect seabirds
Council, White House talk monument expansion
Louisiana shrimpers hurt by price drop
Maine and New Hampshire fish numbers down

 

Inside the Industry

NOAA and its fellow Natural Resource Damage Assessment trustees in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have announced the signing of a formal Record of Decision to implement a gulf restoration plan. The 44 projects, totaling an estimated $627 million, will restore barrier islands, shorelines, dunes, underwater grasses and oyster beds.

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The Golden Gate Salmon Association will host its 4th Annual Marin County Dinner at Marin Catholic High School, 675 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Kentfield on Friday, Oct 10, with doors opening at 5:30 p.m.

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