National Fisherman


The firm hired by the Pebble Partnership to review the company's substantial environmental baseline studies will hold a second set of independent science panels starting May 6. The panels will be held in Anchorage, and will be filmed and broadcast via web-stream live. Remote participants can submit questions and comments by email during the event.

The Keystone Center, which was commissioned to complete the review, is now accepting registrations for the science panels, which will be broken up by topic over two days. On May 6, the panel will focus on vegetation and wetlands, while the May 7 panel will focus on wildlife, habitat and threatened or endangered species.

Independent scientists have been asked to review Pebble Partnership's studies, and panelists and committee members serve without compensation other than travel and lodging expenses. Recommendations that are issued from the panels will be incorporated into a forthcoming report.

The scientific peer review panel, convened and moderated by the Keystone Center, a Colorado-based nonprofit hired to facilitate a dialogue regarding the proposed mine, convened last October amid controversy and anti-Pebble protests. Opponents say the review panel process is biased because it is paid for by the Pebble Partnership. Keystone organizers contend, however, that the scientists reviewing the data are unpaid and unbiased. At last fall's meetings, questions were raised about the methodology used to evaluate certain features of the region, which is being researched in conjunction with a hotly controversial proposed large-scale gold, copper and molybdenum mine in the Bristol Bay watershed.

The Keystone Center said last fall that it hoped to hold the next panel in Bristol Bay.

Read the full story at the Alaska Dispatch>>

The Loud Hailer

A salmon supper

GSSA logoThere’s still time to grab an advance ticket for the Golden Gate Salmon Association’s 3rd annual Sonoma dinner.

 

The special event will feature hors d’oeuvres, Winery Sixteen 600 wines, cocktails, dinner, silent and open auctions, and the chance to compare fish stories with industry members and supporters.

 

Tickets are $150 per person and will not be sold at the door.

 

When:

Friday, March 11

5:30 p.m.

 

Where:

Ramekins Event Center

450 W. Spain St.

Sonoma, CA 95476

 

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the GSSA website


 

 

 

At-sea safety skills

WSG logo HighResYou never know what kind of injuries you might see while out on the water, so you had better be prepared.

 

Washington Sea Grant is hosting a Coast Guard approved first-aid safety course for commercial and recreational fishermen this month, so now is the time to check-up on your safety skills if you’re in the Seattle area.

 

Topics include CPR, patient assessment, hypothermia, cold-water survival, near-drowning, shock, trauma, burns, fractures, choking, immobilization techniques, and essentials for a good first-aid kit and more. Cost is $50. Space is limited, so contact organizer Sarah Fisken at sfisken@uw.edu OR (206)543-1225 to register.

 

When:

Friday, Feb. 26

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Where:

Nordby Conference Room

Fishermen’s Terminal

3919 18th Ave. West

Seattle, WA 98119

 

For a full list of upcoming events, visit their online calendar.

 

Conferences & Events

No upcoming safety training events. Check back soon.

Recipes

06 SmokedSalmonSpreadDownload a printable recipe card.I’ll be the first to admit that this recipe is the result of a failed trip to Dunkin Donuts. They used to sell a smoked salmon cream cheese that was the only reason I would drive by for breakfast – smoked salmon on a sesame bagel. I can still taste it. Unfortunately, Dunkin corporate axed the spread from their lineup.

Lucky for me, I got a glimpse of the ingredients before the flavor was discontinued. They included, in a nutshell, cream cheese, cream and smoked salmon. Well I can do that!

I incorporated the spread into one of my favorite brunch platters. It comes together quickly and features smoked wild sockeye slices, as well as the spread and toppings.

There are a few styles of smoked salmon, but they are not to be confused with lox, which is not smoked at all.

Lox comes from the Yiddish word for salmon, laks. It is traditionally made from salmon belly and brined (but not smoked or cooked). Gravlax or gravad lax is the Scandinavian preparation of salmon that includes spices, herbs and sugars but no smoking.

Cold-smoked salmon (exposed to smoke in an 80-degree environment, so the salmon isn’t cooked during the process) includes Nova-style, which is cold-smoked  after it’s brined. It was so named because Nova Scotia once supplied much of the Northeast with prepared salmon; Scotch or Scottish-style salmon is dry-brined with spices, sugars and other seasonings, which are rinsed off before cold-smoking; Nordic-style is typically salt cured, rinsed and cold-smoked.

Hot-smoked salmon is cooked through and has a distinct smoky flavor, more like bacon or ham, because it is smoked with heat. This is how smoked bluefish, smoked mussels or smoked scallops are prepared.

I prefer hot- or cold-smoked salmon on my breakfast bagel. My favorite, of course, is my own version of smoked salmon cream cheese.

Serves 12, as a platter


Ingredients

8 ounces cream cheese (get the good stuff)
1/4 -1/3 cup half and half (depending on how soft you want the spread to be)
2 ounces smoked salmon, chopped

2016 0209 smokedsalmonspread LRPreparation

Add the cream cheese to the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Add the cream and blend. Add 1.5 ounces of smoked salmon and blend until combined. Fold in the remaining half ounce if you like a few lumps of salmon meat in your spread.

Pack the spread neatly into a bowl and refrigerate, covered, until ready to serve.

Salmon Brunch Platter

Ingredients

1/3 cup capers
1/4 cup each fresh dill and chives, chopped
1/2 medium red onion
1/2 medium shallot
1 medium pickling cucumber, scrubbed clean
1/2 cup smoked mussels
6 ounces smoked salmon slices
Horseradish whipped cream (preparation to follow)
8 ounces plain cream cheese
Fresh fruit
12 fresh bagels

Preparation

I use a mandolin to slice my cucumbers, onions and shallots very thin. I soak the onions and shallots in water, covered, for 2 hours or overnight. Drain before serving.

Just before serving, whip 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream and add 1/4 cup prepared horseradish. Dish into a bowl and serve with a knife or spoon.


Submit a recipe...

See all Recipes

Book Reviews

What’s on your list for summer reading? Well, let me suggest “A Mariner’s Miscellany” by Peter Spectre. It’s a collection of all things relevant and irrelevant concerning the sea, the whimsical and the serious; it’s about boats, ships, anchors, knots and ballast, the lore, poetry and language of the ocean and those who have traveled it.

2015 0526 Miscellany bookThough written in 2005, this collection is a timeless classic.Spectre has written several marine related books and did the yearly “Mariner’s Book of Days,” a nautical desk diary and calendar. He was also editor at International Marine, Wooden Boat and currently Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. Those years spent writing about boats and correcting author’s notions of boats and the sea have endowed him with an eclectic mix of nautical knowledge.

For instance, does anybody know what “dogs running before their master” means? It’s a heavy swell in advance of a hurricane. That’s in the chapter “The Language of the Sea.”

In the same chapter is a listing of the “Different kinds of dead.”
Included is “dead horse” — a cash advance for wages to be earned, and “dead marine” — an empty beer bottle.

In the chapter “Bread is the staff of life; rum is life itself” is a recipe for Serpent’s Breath (a note says it’s enough for the entire crew):
1 bottle dark rum
1 bottle light rum
1 bottle Cognac
7 cups tea
3 cups lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar

Stir the sugar and the lemon juice into the tea, then add the hard stuff. Allow the ingredients to meld for two hours — if you can wait that long.

If you are dumb enough to be at the wheel after sharing in that concoction, it won’t be long before you’re aground. But Spectre’s book tells you how to handle that situation in the chapter “Time and tide wait for no man.”

“If you should run aground on a falling tide and can’t get her off, climb over the side and scrub the bottom while you wait for the tide to return. Your friends will think you went aground on purpose.”

In the book’s 289 pages there’s a whole lot more, some of which you might know, most of which you never heard of. Check it out.


More Book Reviews:

See all Book Reviews

Submit Your Crew Shots

Submit Your Crewshots all year long!

Inside the Industry

NOAA recently published a proposed rule that would implement a traceability plan to help combat IUU fishing. The program would seek to trace the origins of imported seafood by setting up reporting and filing procedures for products entering the U.S.

The traceability program would collect data on harvest, landing, and chain of custody of fish and fish products that have been identified as particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and fraud.

Read more...

The following was released by the Maine Department of Marine Resources on Jan. 22:

The Maine Department of Marine Resources announced an emergency regulation that will support the continued rebuilding effort in Maine’s scallop fishery. The rule, effective January 23, 2016, will close the Muscle Ridge Area near South Thomaston and the Western Penobscot Bay Area.

Read more...
Try a FREE issue of National Fisherman

Fill out this order form, If you like the magazine, get the rest of the year for just $14.95 (12 issues in all). If not, simply write cancel on the bill, return it, and owe nothing.

First Name
Last Name
Address
Country
U.S. Canada Other

City
State/Province
Postal/ Zip Code
Email